Arquivo da categoria: Normal Swallowing

Analysis of Hyoid Bone Using 3D Geometric Morphometrics: An Anatomical Study and Discussion of Potential Clinical Implications

Fakhry N, Puymerail L, Michel J, Santini L, Lebreton-Chakour C, Robert D, Giovanni A, Adalian P, Dessi P.

Dysphagia. 2013 Feb 28.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to obtain a quantitative anatomical description of the hyoid bone using modern 3D reconstruction tools and to discuss potential applications of the knowledge in clinical practice. The study was conducted on 88 intact hyoid bones taken from cadavers during forensic autopsies (group 1) and on 92 bones from CT scan images of living adult subjects (group 2). Three-dimensional reconstructions were created from CT scan images using Amira 5.3.3® software. An anatomical and anthropological study of hyoid bones was carried out using metric and morphological analyses. Groups 1 and 2 were compared to evaluate the influence of muscle traction on hyoid bone shape. Characteristics of the hyoid bone were highly heterogeneous and were closely linked with the sex, height, and weight of the individuals. Length and width were significantly greater in men than in women (39.08 vs. 32.50 mm, p = 0.033 and 42.29 vs. 38.61 mm, p = 0.003), whereas the angle between the greater horns was larger in females (44.09 vs. 38.78, p = 0.007). There was a significant positive correlation between the height (Pearson coefficient correlation r = 0.533, p = 0.01) and weight (r = 0.497, p = 0.01) of subjects and the length of the hyoid bone. Significant metric differences were shown between group 1 and group 2. This very reproducible methodology is important because it may lead to clinical studies in, e.g., head and neck cancer or sleep apnea. Such studies are ongoing in our research program.

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Anúncios

New Directions for Understanding Neural Control in Swallowing: The Potential and Promise of Motor Learning

Ianessa A. Humbert, Rebecca Z. German

Dysphagia, March 2013, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 1-10

Abstract

Oropharyngeal swallowing is a complex sensorimotor phenomenon that has had decades of research dedicated to understanding it more thoroughly. However, the underlying neural mechanisms responsible for normal and disordered swallowing remain very vague. We consider this gap in knowledge the result of swallowing research that has been broad (identifying phenomena) but not deep (identifying what controls the phenomena). The goals of this review are to address the complexity of motor control of oropharyngeal swallowing and to review the principles of motor learning based on limb movements as a model system. We compare this literature on limb motor learning to what is known about oropharyngeal function as a first step toward suggesting the use of motor learning principles in swallowing research.

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Influence of chin-down posture on tongue pressure during dry swallow and bolus swallows in healthy subjects.

Dysphagia. 2011 Sep;26(3):238-45. doi: 10.1007/s00455-010-9292-2. Epub 2010 Jul 27.

Hori KTamine KBarbezat CMaeda YYamori MMüller FOno T.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chin-down posture and bolus size on tongue pressure during swallowing. Eleven healthy volunteers (7 men, 4 women; age range = 26-59 years) participated in the experiments. Tonguepressure during dry and 5- and 15-ml water swallows in neutral and chin-down postures was measured using a sensor sheet system with five measuring points on the hard palate. Sequential order, maximal magnitude, duration, and integrated value oftongue pressure at each measuring point were compared between postures and bolus sizes. Onset of tongue pressure at posterior-circumferential parts occurred earlier in dry swallow than in 5- and 15-ml water swallows in each posture. Chin-down posture was most effective for increasing tongue pressure in the 5-ml water swallow compared with dry swallow and the 15-ml water swallow, but it had almost no influence on tongue pressure with the 15-ml water swallow. These results suggest that chin-down posture increases the tongue driving force for small boluses in healthy subjects, which can be interpreted to mean that oropharyngeal swallowing in a chin-down posture requires more effort.

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Food in liquid consistency and deglutition: a critical review of the literature

Elaine Cristina Pires; Fernanda Chiarion Sassi; Laura Davison Mangilli; Suelly Cecília Olivan Limongi; Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade

Rev. soc. bras. fonoaudiol. vol.17 no.4 São Paulo dez. 2012

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this literature review was to analyze international scientific papers published on the physiology of swallowing fluids in the oral and pharyngeal phases. The employed methodology involved the formulation of a question, the location and selection of studies, and a critical assessment of the manuscripts according to the concepts of the Cochrane Handbook. We identified 185 articles, of which 141 were excluded for not being directly related to the theme. Twenty-nine studies were analyzed. The researchers were strongly focused on ways to identify dysphagia and not on the features offered by swallowing various consistencies. Regarding the methodology employed in the reviewed articles, it was observed that there were no control groups in most studies. The studied groups were heterogeneous, especially when considering individuals with neurological disorders. In addition, the subjects were not paired by age. Thus, the findings of this review indicate that clinicians face great difficulty in applying these scientific findings in their daily practices, which, in turn, limits the use of evidence-based practice.

Keywords: Deglutition; Food; Drinking behavior; Deglutition disorders; Speech, language and hearing sciences

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Alimentos na consistência líquida e deglutição: uma revisão crítica da literatura

Elaine Cristina Pires; Fernanda Chiarion Sassi; Laura Davison Mangilli; Suelly Cecília Olivan Limongi; Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade

Rev. soc. bras. fonoaudiol. vol.17 no.4 São Paulo dez. 2012

RESUMO

O objetivo da presente revisão de literatura foi analisar artigos científicos internacionais publicados sobre a fisiologia da deglutição de alimentos líquidos nas fases oral e faríngea. A metodologia empregada envolveu a formulação da pergunta; localização e seleção dos estudos; avaliação crítica dos artigos; conforme os preceitos do Cochrane Handbook. Foram identificados 185 artigos, dos quais se excluiu 141 por não relacionarem-se diretamente ao tema e analisou-se 29 estudos. As pesquisas estão fortemente relacionadas às formas de identificação de disfagia e não as características proporcionadas pela deglutição de diferentes consistências. Quanto à metodologia empregada nos artigos analisados observa-se que na maioria dos estudos não há grupo-controle. Os grupos estudados são heterogêneos, principalmente quando considerando indivíduos com alterações neurológicas, além disso, não há pareamento de idade na maioria dos estudos. Dessa forma, os achados desta revisão demonstram que há dificuldade na aplicabilidade clínica dos achados científicos, dificultando a prática baseada evidências.

Descritores: Deglutição; Alimentos; Comportamento de ingestão de líquido; Transtornos de deglutição; Fonoaudiologia

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The effects of aspiration status, liquid type, and bolus volume on pharyngeal peak pressure in healthy older adults

Butler SG; Stuart A; Wilhelm E; Rees C; Williamson J; Kritchevsky S

Dysphagia;26(3):225-31, 2011 Sep.

The reasons for aspiration in healthy adults remain unknown. Given that the pharyngeal phase of swallowing is a key component of the safe swallow, it was hypothesized that healthy older adults who aspirate are likely to generate less pharyngeal peak pressures when swallowing. Accordingly, pharyngeal and upper esophageal sphincter pressures were examined as a function of aspiration status (i.e., nonaspirator vs. aspirator), sensor location (upper vs. lower pharynx), liquid type (i.e., water vs. milk), and volume (i.e., 5 vs. 10 ml) in healthy older adults. Manometric measurements were acquired with a 2.1-mm catheter during flexible endoscopic evaluation. Participants (N = 19, mean age = 79.2 years) contributed 28 swallows; during 8 swallows, simultaneous manometric measurements of upper and lower pharyngeal and upper esophageal pressures were obtained. Pharyngeal manometric peak pressure was significantly less for aspirators (mean = 82, SD = 31 mmHg) than for nonaspirators (mean = 112, SD = 20 mmHg), and upper pharyngeal pressures (mean = 85, SD = 32 mmHg) generated less pressure than lower pharyngeal pressures (mean = 116, SD = 38 mmHg). Manometric measurements vary with respect to aspiration status and sensor location. Lower pharyngeal pressures in healthy older adults may predispose them to aspiration.

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Anatomy and physiology of the velopharyngeal mechanism

Perry JL
Semin Speech Lang; 32(2): 83-92, 2011 May.
ABSTRACT
Understanding the normal anatomy and physiology of the velopharyngeal mechanism is the first step in providing appropriate diagnosis and treatment for children born with cleft lip and palate. The velopharyngeal mechanism consists of a muscular valve that extends from the posterior surface of the hard palate (roof of mouth) to the posterior pharyngeal wall and includes the velum (soft palate), lateral pharyngeal walls (sides of the throat), and the posterior pharyngeal wall (back wall of the throat). The function of the velopharyngeal mechanism is to create a tight seal between the velum and pharyngeal walls to separate the oral and nasal cavities for various purposes, including speech. Velopharyngeal closure is accomplished through the contraction of several velopharyngeal muscles including the levator veli palatini, musculus uvulae, superior pharyngeal constrictor, palatopharyngeus, palatoglossus, and salpingopharyngeus. The tensor veli palatini is thought to be responsible for eustachian tube function.