Arquivo da tag: Deglutition disorders

Risperidone-induced bulbar palsy-like syndrome

Sico JJ; Patwa H

Dysphagia;26(3):340-3, 2011 Sep.

There have been several case reports of risperidone-associated dysphagia. Risperidone-induced bulbar palsy-like syndrome has not been previously described. We report on a 58-year-old gentleman with prior history of schizophrenia and remote chlorpromazine use with no history of extrapyramidal symptoms who experienced acute onset of dysphagia and facial diplegia with hyperprolactinemia while being treated with risperidone. To date there have been five reported cases of dysphagia associated with risperidone, occurring by such mechanisms as isolated pharyngeal dysfunction from pharyngeal constrictor palsy and dystonia, drug-induced parkinsonism, and acute dystonic reaction. These cases were associated either with initiation or up-titration of risperidone, with complete resolution of dysphagia after medication discontinuation or dose change. Our patient developed dysphagia within 2 weeks of taking risperidone and completely resolved 1 month after the medication was stopped. Unlike other reported cases, our patient also experienced symptomatic hyperprolactinemia, another known side effect of risperidone. Physicians should also be aware that risperidone can be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia secondary to an acute bulbar palsy-like syndrome that places patients at increased risk of aspiration events and its associated morbidity and mortality.

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Measuring elderly dysphagic patients’ performance in eating–a review

Hansen T; Kjaersgaard A; Faber J

Disabil Rehabil;33(21-22):1931-40, 2011.

PURPOSE: This review aims to identify psychometrically robust assessment tools suitable for measuring elderly dysphagic patients’ performance in eating for use in clinical practice and research. METHOD: Electronic databases, related citations and references were searched to identify assessment tools integrating the complexity of the eating process. Papers were selected according to criteria defined a priori. Data were extracted regarding characteristics of the assessment tools and the evidence of reliability, validity and responsiveness. Quality appraisal was undertaken using developed criteria concerning the study design, the statistics used for the psychometric evaluation and the reported values. RESULTS: Eight of fourteen identified assessment tools met the inclusion criteria. Three assessment tools were specific to dementia, two were specific to stroke and three targeted a range of neurological and geriatric conditions. The rigor of the assessment tools’ psychometric properties varied from no evidence available to excellent evidence. Only two assessment tools were rated adequate to excellent. CONCLUSION: ‘The Minimal Eating Observation Form-Version II’ to be used for screening and ‘The McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment’ to be used for treatment planning and monitoring appeared to be psychometrically robust for clinical practice and research. However, further research on their psychometric properties is needed.

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Medicine administration errors in patients with dysphagia in secondary care: a multi-centre observational study

Kelly J; Wright D; Wood J

J Adv Nurs;67(12):2615-27, 2011 Dec.

AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the interventions used by nurses when administering oral medicines to patients with and without dysphagia, to quantify the appropriateness of these interventions and the medicine administration error rate. BACKGROUND: The administration of medicines to patients with dysphagia is complex and potentially more error prone because of the need to match the medication’s formulation to the swallowing ability of the patient. METHOD: Data was collected on the preparation and administration of oral medicines to patients with and without dysphagia, including those with enteral feeding tubes, using undisguised direct observation of 65 nurse-led medicine administration rounds on stroke and care-of-the-elderly wards at four acute general hospitals in East of England between 1 March and 30 June 2008. RESULTS: Of the 2129 medicine administrations observed, 817 involved an error, and of these 313 involved patients with dysphagia. Excluding time errors, the normalized frequency of medicine administration errors for patients with dysphagia was 21.1% compared with 5.9% for patients without. Using a mixed effects model and excluding time errors, there is a higher risk of errors for patients with dysphagia (excluding patients with enteral tubes) compared with those without (P < 0.001) and a further increase in risk of error for patients with enteral tubes compared with dysphagic patients without tubes (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The increased medicine administration error rate in patients with dysphagia requires healthcare professionals to take extra care when prescribing, dispensing and administering medicines to this group.

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Awareness of dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease

Bayés-Rusiñol À; Forjaz MJ; Ayala A; Crespo Mde L; Prats A; Valles E; Petit C; Casanovas M; Garolera-Freixa M

Rev Neurol;53(11):664-72, 2011 Dec 1.

INTRODUCTION AND AIM: In order to be able to assess the level of awareness of swallowing disorders in Parkinson’s disease (PD), a specific questionnaire was designed and validated: the Dysphapark questionnaire. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 470 persons with PD were asked whether they believe they have problems swallowing or not, and then they filled in a self-administered questionnaire that evaluates the effectiveness and safety of swallowing. The Dysphapark questionnaire was validated by means of Rasch analysis and classical psychometric methods. RESULTS: The safety and effectiveness dimensions of the Dysphapark fit the Rasch model well. The efficacy dimension showed significant differences for gender, length of the illness, awareness of dysphagia and length of meals. Significant differences were also found in the safety dimension for length and severity of illness, awareness of dysphagia, speech therapy and knowledge of thickening agents. Despite the fact that 90% of patients had problems concerning effectiveness and safety in swallowing, 79.45% were not aware that they suffered from dysphagia. CONCLUSIONS: The Dysphapark questionnaire is a suitable measure of dysphagia in PD, according to the Rasch analysis. A high proportion of patients with PD have dysphagia, although it has been observed that they have a low level of awareness of the condition, of the consequences it may have and of the possibility of using thickening agents. Given that some of the swallowing disorders in PD are asymptomatic and that the level of awareness of the disorder is low, we recommend including specific questionnaires as well as clinical and instrumental evaluation of dysphagia in clinical practice.

 

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Assessments in Australian stroke rehabilitation units: a systematic review of the post-stroke validity of the most frequently used

Kitsos G; Harris D; Pollack M; Hubbard IJ

Disabil Rehabil;33(25-26):2620-32, 2011.

PURPOSE: In Australia, stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. For most stroke survivors, the recovery process is challenging, and in the first few weeks their recovery is supported with stroke rehabilitation services. Stroke clinicians are expected to apply an evidence-based approach to stroke rehabilitation and, in turn, use standardised and validated assessments to monitor stroke recovery. In 2008, the National Stroke Foundation conducted the first national audit of Australia’s post acute stroke rehabilitation services and findings identified a vast array of assessments being used by clinicians. This study undertook a sub-analysis of the audit’s assessment tools data with the aim of making clinically relevant recommendations concerning the validity of the most frequently selected assessments. METHOD: Data reduction ranked the most frequently selected assessments across a series of sub-categories. A serial systematic review of relevant literature using Medline and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature identified post-stroke validity ranking. RESULTS: The study found that standardised and non-standardised assessments are currently in use in stroke rehabilitation. It recommends further research in the sub-categories of strength, visual acuity, dysphagia, continence and nutrition and found strengths in the sub-categories of balance and mobility, upper limb function and mood. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to map national usage of post-stroke assessments and review that usage against the evidence. It generates new knowledge concerning what assessments we currently use post stroke, what we should be using and makes some practical post stroke clinical recommendations.

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Implementation of evidence-based treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke (QASC): a cluster randomised controlled trial

Middleton S; McElduff P; Ward J; Grimshaw JM; Dale S; D’Este C; Drury P; Griffiths R; Cheung NW; Quinn C; Evans M; Cadilhac D; Levi C; QASC Trialists Group

Lancet;378(9804):1699-706, 2011 Nov 12.

BACKGROUND: We assessed patient outcomes 90 days after hospital admission for stroke following a multidisciplinary intervention targeting evidence-based management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke units (ASUs). METHODS: In the Quality in Acute Stroke Care (QASC) study, a single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial, we randomised ASUs (clusters) in New South Wales, Australia, with immediate access to CT and on-site high dependency units, to intervention or control group. Patients were eligible if they spoke English, were aged 18 years or older, had had an ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage, and presented within 48 h of onset of symptoms. Intervention ASUs received treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction with multidisciplinary team building workshops to address implementation barriers. Control ASUs received only an abridged version of existing guidelines. We recruited pre-intervention and post-intervention patient cohorts to compare 90-day death or dependency (modified Rankin scale [mRS] ≥2), functional dependency (Barthel index), and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. Research assistants, the statistician, and patients were masked to trial groups. All analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered at the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), number ACTRN12608000563369. FINDINGS: 19 ASUs were randomly assigned to intervention (n=10) or control (n=9). Of 6564 assessed for eligibility, 1696 patients’ data were obtained (687 pre-intervention; 1009 post-intervention). Results showed that, irrespective of stroke severity, intervention ASU patients were significantly less likely to be dead or dependent (mRS ≥2) at 90 days than control ASU patients (236 [42%] of 558 patients in the intervention group vs 259 [58%] of 449 in the control group, p=0·002; number needed to treat 6·4; adjusted absolute difference 15·7% [95% CI 5·8-25·4]). They also had a better SF-36 mean physical component summary score (45·6 [SD 10·2] in the intervention group vs 42·5 [10·5] in the control group, p=0·002; adjusted absolute difference 3·4 [95% CI 1·2-5·5]) but no improvement was recorded in mortality (21 [4%] of 558 in intervention group and 24 [5%] of 451 in the control group, p=0·36), SF-36 mean mental component summary score (49·5 [10·9] in the intervention group vs 49·4 [10·6] in the control group, p=0·69) or functional dependency (Barthel Index ≥60: 487 [92%] of 532 patients vs 380 [90%] of 423 patients; p=0·44). INTERPRETATION: Implementation of multidisciplinary supported evidence-based protocols initiated by nurses for the management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction delivers better patient outcomes after discharge from stroke units. Our findings show the possibility to augment stroke unit care. FUNDING: National Health & Medical Research Council ID 353803, St Vincent’s Clinic Foundation, the Curran Foundation, Australian Diabetes Society-Servier, the College of Nursing, and Australian Catholic University.

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Dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery: a prospective study using the swallowing-quality of life questionnaire and analysis of patient comorbidities

Siska PA; Ponnappan RK; Hohl JB; Lee JY; Kang JD; Donaldson WF

Spine (Phila Pa 1976);36(17):1387-91, 2011 Aug 1

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study of 29 patients who underwent anterior cervical (AC) or posterior lumbar (PL) spinal surgery. A validated measure of dysphagia, the Swallowing-Quality of Life (SWAL-QOL) survey, was used to assess the degree of postoperative dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To determine the degree of dysphagia preoperatively and postoperatively in patients undergoing AC surgery compared with a control group that underwent PL surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Dysphagia is a well-known complication of AC spine surgery and has been shown to persist for up to 24 months or longer. METHODS: A total of 18 AC patients and a control group of 11 PL patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and were assessed preoperatively and at 3 weeks and 1.5 years postoperatively using a 14-item questionnaire from the SWAL-QOL survey to determine degree of dysphagia. Other patient factors and anesthesia records were examined to evaluate their relationship to dysphagia. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the AC and PL groups with respect to age, sex, body mass index, or length of surgery. The SWAL-QOL scores at 3 weeks were significantly lower for the AC group than for the PL group (76 vs. 96; P = 0.001), but there were no differences between the groups preoperatively or at final follow-up. Smokers, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and women had lower SWAL-QOL scores at one or more time point. CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing AC surgery had a significant increase in the degree of dysphagia 3 weeks after surgery compared with patients undergoing PL surgery. By final follow-up, swallowing in the AC group recovered to a level similar to preoperative and comparable to that in patients undergoing lumbar surgery at 1.5 years. Smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and female sex are possible factors in the development of postoperative dysphagia.

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